Monday, October 20, 2014

Quilting Problems

Last week I started quilting my bias tape challenge quilt. Now I've made a mess of it, and I've been stewing about what to do.

What happened is that I began quilting, outlining the basic shapes with straight-line quilting to get everything stabilized. At first I used my free motion foot to quilt, but then decided I would have prettier stitches if I used my walking foot. That's when disaster happened.

Recently, my walking foot and machine were serviced to figure out why the foot wouldn't "walk." The tech figured out that the top pressure wasn't tightened down. I suspect the walking foot itself was oiled/greased.

So as I was quilting, twisting the quilt to make a turn, it bunched under the back of the walking foot smearing grease on the white Kona. By the time I realized it, the damage was done. Since then I have thoroughly wiped out the bottom inside of the walking foot.

From a distance, the grease doesn't look so bad, but a judge would certainly see it - if this quilt even gets into a show! The red arrows are pointing at them.

I've tried all sorts of things to remove the marks, testing on the edge of the quilt top where there's also a grease smear. I've used Zout, Dawn dishwashing liquid, lighter fluid, and bleach. I'm hesitant to do anything more. What makes removal even more difficult is that the quilt is already quilted, so I can't just spot-clean the quilt top.

You can guess that I've been very upset - even sleepless - because of this. What's worse is that it isn't the first time I've had a problem when attempting to make a show quilt! My first experience was marking a quilt design using a Sharpie to draw on Glad Press and Seal, and last year I had a problem with FriXion pens - which I no longer use to mark quilting designs. You'd think I'd learn to be more careful.

Because I've been off quilting, recovering from my procedure, I've been thinking about my options. This might be a possibility - a cover-up with more newsprint bias tape. But honestly, I don't like how it changes the overall design.

Is there an ink or paint that would cover it up. Maybe a dense quilting design?

Often, I tell my beginner quiltmaking students that if they make a mistake or encounter a problem, they should look at it as an opportunity to make the quilt even better. I need to heed my own advice, especially since I like how the rest of the quilt is looking. Linda

27 comments:

  1. You might try taking it to a good dry cleaner. I had one once get paint out of a silk blouse. If you tell them the problem, they may be able to help. So sorry this happened!

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  2. Goodness. I'm just sick over this. I sure hope you are either able to remove the marks or come up with a redesign. bummer!!!

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  3. Can you cut that piece out and hand applique a small patch? The quilting should hide the patch.

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  4. How horrible for you! I have no ideas other than the ones already given. I hope you can fix it. Your quilting so far is gorgeous!

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  5. Oh no, I feel so sorry and at the moment I have no advice for you.. But as I know you I'm sure you'll find a good solutions for this problem.
    Edith

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  6. Ugh! I feel so bad for you! I am out of ideas except to applique something on top of it, but I am thinking this is not is your design plan....

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  7. I've used a product called "Sew Clean" that I got from Patty B. at Creekside. A bit costly at $11/pint but it took out some old stains. Says it takes out ball point ink, crayon, lipstick, oil & grease, rust and some others. Citrus based. Norma

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  8. This is a terrible thing to happen Linda! I really feel for you! I don't have any suggestions either. Be careful that you don't set the stain when trying all your options.....

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  9. Oh, Linda, I feel your frustration. I had relative success when a quilt was ret'd from the quilter with oil on it using baking powder. But I fear all of your attempts may have set the oil. It's worth a try, anyway. At this point, can't hurt. Good luck making the best of an awful situation. Remember: Prospective.

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  10. Oh my! I bet you're really "cheesed off" to say the least.
    Sounds like you've done everything to get rid of it.
    Sorry I can't help.

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  11. I'm feeling desperately sad that this has happened to you, Linda, especially as your quilting is looking so fabulous. Apart from my IG comment I can't help, but I admire your attitude and have every confidence that you'll embrace this 'plot twist' and come up with something to save your lovely quilt. Xxx

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  12. Well, darn!!! that's awful...tryan OxiClean type product. Keep us posted!

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  13. My Gran is the satin remover in my family and she just gets the area wet, adds salt and scrubs at it a bit with her nail. Someone above suggested removing the stained area and hand appliquéing new piece of the same fabric, I'd try that. Also if you know you're going to quilt a certain design in that area, paisley for example, you could make the appliqué piece paisley shaped, and quilt it so that the seam line looks like a quilting line.

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  14. Oh Linda, I feel for you! That is so heart breaking! My best advice would be to cover it up with additional fabric, even if it changes the design. I don't think a dense enough quilting design will cover the damage :-(

    So, so sorry!!

    Or maybe you can cut the piece out as suggested above and add in another white piece by hand. With enough quilting the seam wouldn't be noticeable.

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  15. OH NO! That's too bad. I don't have any suggestions, but just support that you find a solution.

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  16. I can see why you've had some sleepless nights. We've had good luck with using a degreaser from home depot. How do mechanics get grease off their hands? Their clothes? That's where my mind is going...

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  17. Oh dear, oh dear, what a bummer! When I first looked at the photo I thought there were two little holes, but not, it's grease. And I don't knot what would be worst. It seems you've tried everything to remove the stain, so I'm not sure I can recommend anything either. I did Google it and baby powder came up a few times. Apparently you'll put enough on the stain to completely cover it and leave it for a while. Then brush it off. But if nothing works your best option is probably to cover it with an extra design element. I really feel for you!

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  18. Oh, Linda, what a bummer! I am so sorry that this has happened to you again. What are the chances. Like others, my first thought is to applique a small patch of Kona and then add some more quilting in that area to cover it. All of this just adds to the "story" of the quilt! Perspective...right!!

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  19. Oh what a terrible thing to happen to you. I use Sew Clean to get out difficult spots on my customers' quilts when I see something that they left behind. It works well with a q-tip and multiple applications, if needed. Has a great smell too. I'm sure you will find a solution to remedy this problem.

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  20. Oh my, I really like your solution! It is a modern quilt, and another element added will only make your design better. It's that ol' lemonade out of lemons thing!

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  21. How upsetting! And things like this just play on your mind, not in a good way. I's suggest the first approach of removal rather than changing the overall design with a cover up. So two thoughts on that- CitraSolv? It's a strong de-greaser. Second thought is a visit to the auto supply store to see what kinds of mean green, or other types of solvent soaps they have available. Good luck and keep us posted.

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  22. Oh, no. I'm so sorry this happened. I wish I could present you with a perfect idea but I think you've got a good start wtih your other comments. I hope something gets it out, but if not, I know you will come up with a creative solution to fix it. Take a break from it and then go back to it when things don't look so bad!

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  23. I can feel your pain Linda. Don't have any suggestions other than the idea of adding more bias. It's hard to see in the photo how well this would work. Try to relax and take some time off. Then maybe when you get back to it a solution will present itself. What I can see so far is really nice.

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  24. How terrible Linda I feel your pain especially on such a beautiful quilt and all the work that you have done on it.
    But Linda I know you will come up with a solution. Don't give up on it Hon. Blessings Sandra

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  25. You should try mechanics hand cleaner, like "Gojo". It works wonders on grease. It will take some patient work but the grease will come out.
    Good luck to you. What a shame. So sorry.

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  26. Since I'm working backwards, catching up on my blog reading, I know that you have averted disaster! But you write so wrenchingly about this awful experience that I feel very badly for you, even though I know you made it work. I am loving that quilt!

    Elizabeth

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